My work at A Quiet Room means more to me than simply earning money, and I keep the door open to all.  Fees are decided on a sliding scale based upon what you tell me you can afford.  The lowest fee matches the typical charge at a neighborhood clinic offering services to people with limited incomes, including artists and writers and students and creative people.  My top fee is commensurate with rates charged by therapists with my level of experience in TriBeCa, my neighborhood in New York City.  I will ask you to pay the top fee only if you have the means to do so.  I can provide you with an invoice for my services that you can submit to your insurer for reimbursement.  I work with many clients who live overseas or in different cities, via the internet, using Skype or other videochat services.  In all instances, I ask for a minimum of 24 hours notice to cancel an appointment, or I will charge for the late cancellation.  

 

You can come to A Quiet Room as often or as seldom as you wish – whether that means a single 50-minute session, or a session every week or every month, or whenever you have a thought or feeling you'd like to put into words, or simply need a place to regain your center, or hone an insight.  

 

If you care to visit and see if this work if right for you, please call or email so we can set up an appointment.  I'm here to listen.  

 

 

Money can be a distraction.  As a general principle, if you put money before people - including yourself - it will always end badly.  

If you love your work the money takes care of itself.  And it's worth a lot to wake up in the morning looking forward to your day.

In psychotherapy, money is often a surrogate for security in love.

If you felt insecure in your parents' care as a child, you will probably worry about money.

if you felt loved and appreciated as a kid, you're probably not unduly concerned about finances.

Either way, money won't make you live forever.  

Steve Ross, the Time/Life mogul, earned seventy-eight million dollars in 1990.

He died of prostate cancer in 1992. 

 

From Life is a Brief Opportunity for Joy

 

 

For an article from Will's blog, The People's Therapist, on the meaning of fame and fortune, click here.